Being thanked gives me the warm fuzzies

So I just got this email and I thought I would share it verbatim: I just wanted to thank you for such a great piece of software (dhcpcd)… I often forget the people that make all this cool stuff that make linux. bsd and all the other unixes work… so rather sending a bug report, I’d just though i’d send you a hello! and thanks for giving my machines ip addresses!
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Downgrade is the new Upgrade

My home server for a few years has been a Gigabyte BRIX 1900. Aside from powering this site, my email, project mailing lists and source code repositories, I use use it to host some VM’s as XEN DOMU HVM guests so I can ensure my code works on many operating systems. However, the VM hosting brought my server to it’s knees. I’ve recently purchased an AMD 2600x which I’ve fitted out with 32GB RAM.
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NetBSD curses erase functions fixed

NetBSD PR lib/23910 was filed over 16 years ago. It describes how NetBSD curses fails to work with Vifm, a Vim interface for a curses GUI file manager. It’s quite a nice idea after playing around with it some as Vim is my favourite text editor. Since I was the main protagonist in bringing terminfo to NetBSD, I had a reasonable grasp on how our curses worked and I had looked at this bug before, but left scratching my head over it.
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terminfo numeric parameters promoted from short to int

POSIX mandates implementations must support upto a short but may exceed it. When NetBSD terminfo was implemented, no terminfo description used over a short, but because ncurses has supported ints for some time, some now do. Infact, such a terminfo description was imported where colour pairs for screen-256color went up to 65536 which exposed a bug in the existing implementation where it was set to zero. Because the number might mean something more than a range, we need to be able to store it accurately.
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The Perils of Self Updating Web Apps

So I’ve used Grav since 2017 to power my project and blog pages. It’s a flat-file Content Management System. It’s really easy to use and takes away a lot of the pain of setup. By easy to use I mean you don’t ever have to use the command line after the initial setup and the admin pages and general look and feel are really nice and clean. Internally, Grav uses markdown files to store the user pages using frontmatter to store meta-data such as tags, publication date, etc.
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